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Posts for: October, 2018

PayingAttentiontoCertainFactorsHelpsEnsureSuccessfulImplantOutcomes

Implants are highly regarded by both dentists and patients for their versatility and durability. But it’s their life-like appearance that “seals the deal” as the restoration of choice — not only mimicking an individual tooth, but emerging from the gum line and blending indistinguishably with other teeth in color and symmetry.

To achieve this result, we must consider a few factors beforehand, particularly the amount of bone available at the intended implant site. An implant requires a certain amount of bone to properly position it for the most natural crown appearance. The bone present around adjacent teeth can also affect your appearance: in the absence of adequate bone the papillae, triangular shaped gum tissue between teeth, may not regenerate properly between the implant and the natural teeth. This can leave a noticeable void, what dentists call “black hole disease.”

Bone loss is a significant problem particularly after tooth loss. It’s quite possible for you to lose a quarter of the bone’s width in the first year after tooth loss. To avoid this, we often use bone grafting techniques immediately after extraction to lessen bone loss; if it’s already occurred we may be able to use similar reconstructive techniques to rebuild and encourage renewed bone growth. In the end, though, if there remains a significant level of bone loss it may be necessary to consider another option for tooth replacement other than implants.

The thickness of your gum tissue, a genetic trait, can also have an impact on the implant’s ultimate appearance. Thicker gum tissues are generally more resilient and easier to work with surgically. Thinner gum tissues are more susceptible to recession and tend to be more translucent, which could cause the underlying metal implant to be visible. Thus, working with thinner gum tissues requires a more delicate approach when trying to achieve a visually appealing result.

All these factors must be balanced, from implantation to final crown placement. But with careful planning and attention to detail throughout the process, many of these issues can be overcome to produce a satisfying result — a new and appealing smile.

If you would like more information on the aesthetics of dental implants, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Matching Teeth & Implants.”


By Donald K. Ruddell, DDS
October 18, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: dental implants  
WhatyoucanExpectifYoureUndergoingImplantSurgery

If you’re considering different options for tooth replacement, dental implants are likely high on your list. Implants have a proven reputation for both durability and life-like appearance that can restore mouth function and revitalize your smile.

There is one aspect concerning implants, however, which gives people pause — the surgical procedure required to place the implants in the jawbone. If you’re leery about undergoing this procedure we can put your mind at ease — for most patients implant surgery is a minor, pain-free process with little discomfort afterward.

While there are variations in style, implants generally have two major components: a titanium post that’s implanted into the jawbone and a permanent life-like crown that’s affixed 6 to 12 weeks after implant surgery. Titanium is the metal of choice because of its affinity with bone cells; over time bone will grow to and attach itself around the implant, a process known as osseo-integration. The metal post is normally spiral in shape, allowing it more surface area for bone to adhere to.

In the beginning of the procedure we administer local anesthesia to fully numb the area before proceeding. After accessing the bone through tiny incisions in the gum tissue, we create a small channel in the exposed bone. A surgical guide may be used to prepare the precise location for the implant with a series of drilling sequences that increases the channel until it matches the implant size. While this takes place, you should only feel a mild vibration and a little pressure from the drill.

The implants are then removed from their sterile packaging and placed immediately into the prepared site. The gum tissues are then sutured into place with self-absorbing sutures. Most people have only mild discomfort after the surgery that can be managed with a prescription-strength non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug like ibuprofen. We may also prescribe antibiotics and other care instructions to ensure successful gum tissue healing.

With proper planning and precise implant placement by skilled hands, implant surgery is an easy and uneventful procedure. And, with your new crowns in place, your new, beautiful smile will make the experience a distant memory.

If you would like more information on dental implants, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dental Implant Surgery.”


By Donald K. Ruddell, DDS
October 08, 2018
Category: Oral Health
Tags: tmj disorders   jaw pain  
TrytheConservativePathtoJawPainReliefFirst

If you have chronic jaw pain, you know how difficult eating, speaking or even smiling can be. Many sufferers will do anything to gain relief, even surgery. But before you go down that road, consider the traditional conservative approach to temporomandibular disorders (TMD) management first—it could provide the most relief with the least risk of side effects.

The temporomandibular joints connect the lower jaw to the skull on either side of the head. These ball and socket joints also contain a cushioning disk to facilitate movement. This disk is believed to be the primary focus for jaw pain problems known collectively as TMD.

Doctors now believe injury, stress, metabolic issues, jaw anatomy defects or similar factors trigger the chain reaction of muscle spasms, pain and soreness that can erupt during a TMD episode. A TMD patient may experience pain within the jaw muscles or joints themselves, clicking sensations, or an inability to open the jaw to its full range.

TMD therapy has traditionally followed an orthopedic path—treating jaw joints like any other joint. In recent years, though, a more aggressive treatment model has emerged that promotes more invasive techniques like orthodontics, dental work or jaw surgery to relieve discomfort. But the track record for this model, especially concerning jaw surgery, remains hazy at best and offers no guarantee of relief. These techniques are also irreversible and have even made symptoms worse in some patients.

It’s usually prudent, then, to try conservative treatments first. This can include pain and muscle relaxant medication, jaw exercises, stretching and massage, and dietary changes to reduce chewing force. Patients with teeth grinding habits may also benefit from a bite guard worn at night to reduce the biting force during sleep and help the joints relax.

By finding the right mix of treatments, you may be able to find significant relief from TMD symptoms with the conservative approach. If not, you might then discuss more invasive options with your dentist. But even if your dentist recommends such a procedure, you would be wise to seek a second opinion.

TMD can definitely interfere with your quality of life and peace of mind. But there are ways to reduce its effects and make for a happier life.

If you would like more information on managing chronic jaw pain, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Seeking Relief from TMD.”